Thursday, 3 September 2015

Neli Kolam


A beautiful Neli Kolam it is…
Sometimes no extra decorations are needed…
The dots and well-planned lines are all that is required!

PS: Because many people asked me what a Kolam is…
Kolam refers to intricate patterns drawn both free handedly and by joining dots. These can be widely seen in the Southern part of India. Women draw this early morning, preferably before Sunrise after cleaning the courtyard. Earlier rice powder was used – it was a means to feed ants and small insects. However, these days, stone powder and even chalk is used. If such powders are used, it is called Pudi Kolam. Sometimes, brick powder will be used as outline on auspicious days, Tuesdays and Fridays. If rice powder is mixed in water and similar patterns are drawn, it is called Maavu/Maa Kolam. In West Bengal, it is called Alpona. In North India, people used rice/stone powders for the outline and fill the patterns with colors. This is called Rangoli.

It is believed that Kolam brings prosperity. It is drawn for almost all the auspicious occasions like marriages and festivals. When someone dies in the household, the family don’t draw any kolam for a year.  

Children in small towns learn the art of making kolam at a very young age. In fact, a girl who knows to draw impeccable and intricate kolam is a pride for the entire family and the village she stays. However, owing to modernization, city life and apartment culture, this art is soon dying.


Tuesday, 1 September 2015

Words. Thoughts. Ants


 “If the ink of my writing morphed into ants, would they march along with my thoughts?

Jarod Kintz

Sunday, 30 August 2015

Through the Window

I peeked through the window
There were only buildings.
And people.
Some chasing time; some destiny.
Fiddling with mobile phones;
Nodding to the songs played in ear-phones.

I looked around;
Searched for the birds.
And the leaves that rustles in breeze.
There were neither, I shuddered.
Cacophony of honks maddened me
I closed my window.


Friday, 28 August 2015

Enthralling Kolam!!!


I am so proud of this Kolam…
It drained me, really.
I had to concentrate relentlessly…
But when I saw the final output
I was enthralled!

Are you?

Between... 

wishing you a happy and prosperous Onam J

PS: Because many people asked me what a Kolam is…
Kolam refers to intricate patterns drawn both free handedly and by joining dots. These can be widely seen in the Southern part of India. Women draw this early morning, preferably before Sunrise after cleaning the courtyard. Earlier rice powder was used – it was a means to feed ants and small insects. However, these days, stone powder and even chalk is used. If such powders are used, it is called Pudi Kolam. Sometimes, brick powder will be used as outline on auspicious days, Tuesdays and Fridays. If rice powder is mixed in water and similar patterns are drawn, it is called Maavu/Maa Kolam. In West Bengal, it is called Alpona. In North India, people used rice/stone powders for the outline and fill the patterns with colors. This is called Rangoli.

It is believed that Kolam brings prosperity. It is drawn for almost all the auspicious occasions like marriages and festivals. When someone dies in the household, the family don’t draw any kolam for a year.  

Children in small towns learn the art of making kolam at a very young age. In fact, a girl who knows to draw impeccable and intricate kolam is a pride for the entire family and the village she stays. However, owing to modernization, city life and apartment culture, this art is soon dying.



Wednesday, 26 August 2015

Navagraha Temples - Tamil Nadu

As we all know, Kumbakonam is a city of temples. It is also famous for Navagraha (Nive Planets) temples. Located around the city, there are 9 temples, each dedicated to one of the Navagraha (planets). Except the Surya temple, the main deity in all other temples is Lord Shiva.

Suryanar Temple -- Sooriyanar Kovil
Built during the time of Kulottunga Choladeva. This is the only temple where all the navagrahas are present with separate sannidhi. 



Chandra Temple -- Thingaloor
Appoodi Adikal was a great follower of Thirunavukkarasar. He was held in high regards and Appoodi Adikal wanted to host him. On the day of arrival, his son was killed by a venomous snake bite. Yet, Appoodi Adikal went ahead and hosted Thirunavukkarasar. Moved by this selfless act of Appoodi Adikal and his devotion, Thirunavukkarasar miraculously restored the lad to life.


Angaarakan Temple -- Vaitheeswaran Kovil
It is said that Rama, Lakshmana and Saptarishi have worshipped the deity in this place.
One of the nine planets, Angaraka (Mars) who suffered from leprosy and was cured by Lord Vaidhyanathar.

Like Panneeriilai Vibhuthi of Tiruchendur Temple, "Tiruchaandu Urundai" covered with Vibhuti of deity is said to heal various incurable diseases. And, this can be procured at the temple.


Budha Temple – Thiruvenkadu

This temple is considered as an equivalent to the temple at Varanasi. The other 5 shivasthalams are Tiruvaiyaru, Chaayaavanam, Mayiladuthurai, Tiruvidaimarudur and Tiruvanchiam. Indiran, Airavatam, Budhan, Sun God Sooriyan and Moon God Chandiran are said to have worshipped God Shiva here. There are several shrines of significance in this well visited temple, including those to Durga and Kali. The image of Natarajar here is of great beauty. Worship to Aghoramurthy - (Veerabhadrar) is said to be of significance on Sunday nights in this temple. As found in Chidambaram, there is also a shrine for Lord Vishnu near the shrine for Natarajar as well.


Guru Temple – Alangudi

Lord Siva had consumed deadly poison, giving rise to the name Alangudi. The deity here is called “Apatsahayesvarar”, signifying as the savior during hard times.


Sukra Temple – Kanjanur

It is said that Lord Siva blessed Parasara here with His cosmic dance. The presiding deity is Sukra (Venus). However, the main idol in the temple is that of "Agniswarar" or Shiva.


Shani Temple – Thirunallar

After worshipping here, King Nala is said to have been relieved of his afflictions due to the malefic influence of Saturn. Nala theertham is the most important one. By bathing here, it is believed that one is washed away of all kinds of misfortune and affliction.


Raahu-Kethu Temple – Thirupampuram
Lord Shiva in the temple is a swayambu. Rahu and Ketu unlike separately in other temples, they are here in a single body having Lord in their mind.

It is said that a divine serpent lost his poison due to Lord Shiva’s curse, He prayed here to Lord Shiva and got back the power.  Therefore, it is believed that people who had lost anything valuable in their life will get it back by praying to Lord Shiva here. 


Ketu Temple – Keezhperumpallam

Rahu and Ketu are associated with the legend of the churning of the milky ocean by Lord Shiva. It is said that Kethu had worshipped Lord Shiva here. There is a shrine dedicated to Kethu in this temple.

PS: If you are planning a trip to Kumbakonam, Murugan Residency (I stayed here) and Sitthi Residency (Opposite to Murugan Residency) can be a really good option to stay. Do not miss the famous Kumbakonam Degree coffee… And for travel, if you are looking for a good taxi service, you can contact Shankar - 9524724442.

Monday, 24 August 2015

The Thorn Birds

Details of the Book
No. of Pages   : 692
ISBN               : 0380018179 (ISBN13: 9780380018178)
Language        : English


From the book blurb
Powered by the dreams and struggles of three generations, THE THORN BIRDS is the epic saga of a family rooted in the Australian sheep country. At the story's heart is the love of Meggie Cleary, who can never possess the man she desperately adores, and Ralph de Bricassart, who rises from parish priest to the inner circles of the Vatican...but whose passion for Meggie will follow him all the days of his life.

Family secrets, forbidden love, jealousy and the struggles of working in a hard new land intertwine in Colleen McCullough's bestselling romantic family saga making it an extremely fascinating read.

The Thorn Birds was listed at number 64 on the BBC's survey The Big Read in 2003 and in 1983, it was adapted as a TV mini-series that became the United States' second highest rated mini-series of all time.


Author
Colleen McCullough is an internationally acclaimed Australian novelist.

Some of her books include The First Man in Rome, The Grass Crown, Fortune’s Favorites, Caesar, The October Horse, and Morgan’s Run.

She was born on 1 June, 1937, in Wellington, in outback central west New South Wales. Since 1963, she spent ten years researching and teaching in the Department of Neurology at the Yale Medical School in New Haven, Connecticut, United States. In the late 1970s, she settled on Norfolk Island in the Pacific, where she met her husband, Ric Robinson, to whom she has been married to since 1983. She now lives in Sydney.


Characters
Meghann Cleary aka Meggie
She is proud and motherly who is insanely in love with Ralph – the man who is not meant to be loved. Because loving him means only pain and more pain.

Ralph de Bricassart aka Ralph
A priest who struggles within to be a prefect priest. In his heart, Ralph knows that his love for Meggie is more than his love for his church; but he never lets anyone know that – not even Meggie.

There are several other eminent characters as well; Luke O'Neill, Fiona Cleary aka Fee Padraic Cleary akka Paddy, Frank, Dane, Justine, Rainer and many others.


What I think
Some books touches our heart and pinches our soul. It stirs our emotions and makes us think. It makes us feel the pain, understand and empathize. Some books do. We know that what we are reading is just a fiction. Still the characters come across as real people with flesh and blood. Their emotions start affecting us as our own; although we know that they are wrong; they are sinned. Then, a question would make us shudder. Wrong and sin? Isn’t that subjective and situational. Aren’t circumstances (mostly) beyond our control? Some books leave a scar in our heart which we know would never fade.

Collen McCullough’s The Thorn Birds is everything and much more I have mentioned above. Extending for three generations and spread across nearly 700 pages, this book is an epic – an epic of love lost and lifelong suffering of Meggie. Often we wonder, if she did the right thing? Did she deserve the pain? Some questions like these are always unanswered though.

The author’s narrative glides with a rehearsed ease and spans over more than fifty years. She describes how Drogheda (a fictional place) in Australia look. She also touches upon how the world war affected common man’s life.

The Thorn Birds is predominantly Meggie’s life – her parents, siblings, husband, children, pain, agony, love and Ralph of course. 

"But we, when we put the thorns in our breasts, we know. We understand. And still we do it. Still we do it."

In short, this book is romantic in its own way; which states that love is such a broad term which need not be always confined within the constraints of marriage or any other such relationship tag. It hints that if hearts connects, distance and the years that passes would never deter the love. It simply says that there is nothing right or wrong in love.

Relish it J


Rating
4/5


Some words that stole my heart
·         "There are no ambitions noble enough to justify breaking someone's heart.”
·         "..the best is only bought at the cost of great pain...or so says the legend"
·         Each of us has within us something that just won’t be denied. Something to which we are driven even though it makes us scream aloud to die."
·         "How frightening, that one person could mean so much, so many things."

Thank you
My cousin for suggesting this book 

Saturday, 22 August 2015

Heartbreak

Heartbreak makes me write
Evaluating the past
Analyzing the fairness of reality
Relishing the Good old moments
Teary eyed I am
Breathings are uneven
Roasting me with guilt
Engulfing me with regret
Astounded I feel at the twist of fate
Kind be the destiny, I pray!!!

Friday, 21 August 2015

G for God? Good? Great?

S
martphones and internet have become a part our daily life like food and water. It is so indispensable that we almost feel incomplete without it. Although, most of the times we struggle to prove it otherwise.

E-Mail have become a comfortable replacement for telegrams and postal services. After all, it is faster and less expensive. Social networking sites like Facebook, Instagram, LinkdIn and Twitter to name a few are a part of our identity. Blogs have become a convenient media to pour our thoughts and share our talents/hobbies with wider audience spread across the globe. Online movies have enabled us to watch great movies within the comforts of our home. Video calls with our loved ones has shrunk the world and made long distance is not a matter of concern at all. And Google of course – the one click solution to all our problems and answer to all our questions.

How can I miss the apps! We use it so often that they have become a habit. We book cabs, search for nice restaurants, book tickets and plan our travel, manager finances, maintain daily journals and so much more with the help of interesting apps.

In short, all the online platforms that I have mentioned above and many other useful/interesting apps has brought revolutionary changes to our life.
DISCLAIMER:  IF AND ONLY IF THE INTERNET WORKS!!!

Since the time I got a smartphone and internet connection, I have only experience slow speed. They said 2G is the answer to it. It was replaced with 3G and then now 4G. Sometimes, I don’t understand these G’s. Sometimes I laugh within when I think if “G” could also mean God – the God who has come to rescue us from utterly slow and boring internet speed.

Well, when I saw the new Airtel ad on 4G, I was excited. Can mobile internet be so fast – like a broadband! That would be a great idea. We invest so much money on a smartphone, for what joy? To enjoy the experience it offers. However, most of the times, we would only frustrated due to the awesome connectivity we get (sarcasm is intentional).
Then, I thought. If the mobile internet can really be so fast, what would I rather do?

·         Watch movies online
I am a big movie buff. I enjoy to experiment. I am also aware of the fact that there are so many celebrated and appreciated movies that I have not watched yet.

·         Video calls
I love to see my loved ones as often as possible. It makes me feel closer to them, if not geographically, emotionally and virtually. I feel like you can’t hide your emotions and speak when you talk on phone. But you cannot hide much and would mostly be yourself on video calls! More so if it is done frequently.

I oh-so crave for internet speed.
I would be really delighted J



PS: This is written for Airtel 4G - The Fastest Network Ever


Thursday, 20 August 2015

There's Something About You

Details of the Book
No. of Pages   :           268 pages
Publisher        :           HarperCollins  
ISBN               :           9351771997 (ISBN13: 9789351771999)
Language        :           English


From the book blurb
This is not your typical boy-meets-girl story. Okay, they do meet, but there are some complications.

Trish is twenty-eight. She’s unemployed, overweight, single and snarky. She knows all that. And if one more person – just one more person – tries to fix her, she might explode. Sahil is thirty-five. He has superpowers. Well, kind of. He seems to think so, anyway. He’s also hot (okay, in a geeky kind of way, but still). And he plays the guitar, helps the underprivileged and talks about his feelings. Aren’t guys like that supposed to exist only in fantasies?

When Trish and Sahil meet, magic happens. Real magic, you know, like fireworks, electricity, that sort of thing. But here’s the problem. Trish doesn’t want anyone in her life. She has enough to deal with – dependent parents, flaky neighbours, bitchy editors, the works. And yet, Sahil is determined to be in her life.

From the bestselling author of Just Married, Please Excuse and Sorting Out Sid, here is another zinger of a book.


Author
Yashodhara Lal's USP is in taking the ordinary and making it hilarious. She graduated from IIM-Bangalore in 2002 and has over 12 years of experience in the Marketing Domain across two large corporations in FMCG and media. She lives in Gurgaon with her husband Vijay, and the three small children they call Peanut, Pickle and Papad - all of whom never fail to provide her with material for her entertaining blog at http://www.yashodharalal.com.

'Just Married, Please Excuse' is her first book. 'Sorting Out Sid' is her latest work of fiction.
(Click here for my review of Just Married, Please Excuse and Sorting Out Sid)


What I think
Trishna aka Trish is an introvert. She shares a very weird relationship with her parents. She is laid out and takes everything for granted until she is fired. She has no friends and fears of losing her independence and identity in a relationship. She also nurtures a fear of losing people and tries to stay emotionally away from everyone. She is also fat and battles inferiority complex because of that. Her father suffers alzeimers and mother is mostly bitter. Her only friend, also a neighbor, Aakansha, is acting strange. Aakansha’s daughter Lisa is mostly withdrawn and not so child-like. Her colleague Niveditha is very pushy and her boss Zee is egoistic. Trish’s new friend, Sahil, is pleasant and friendly; fighting his own inner battles. In short, Trish thinks she is in a mess.

I love Trishna. Her life and problems are so trivial. Her thoughts and fears are so relatable. She is matured and yet, at the same time, childish. She carries her life in her shoulders, in her way – just the way she carries this book!

Author has presented a book free from clichés. Her narrative is lucid. However, most of the time, redundant too. She feels cold towards her mother and her heart melts for her father. It is described so many times, that you are frustrated. Sarcasm was ample in the book. But, I missed the humor that the author had in her other two books.

In the beginning. Trish is always self-pities because she is fat. It really takes a toll on you to see that she blames her over-weight for every mishaps. However, it was a relief to see her transform into a positive person.

The relationship between Trish and Sahil is very well-presented. It is surely not boy-meets-girl and happily-ever-after. It is about friendship, care and camaraderie.  

After enjoying brilliant cover pages of Just Married Please Excuse and Sorting Out Sid in particular, I was thoroughly disappointed with this one. It looks hasty and random. The book blurb gives away the romantic aspect of the book. Although, only a part of the book is about that.

In short, I have to tell you that the book ends pleasantly, connecting all the dots – making this book a worth read! Is 268 worth it? Figure it out yourself.


Rating
3/5


Thank you IndiBlogger J

Tuesday, 18 August 2015

Old is Gold !


This is one of the kolangal that everyone would know…
In fact, during the initial days of learning…
This would be among the toughest designs…

The beauty of such kolam is…
They always remain charming!

May be that’s why they say…
Old is Gold J

PS: Because many people asked me what a Kolam is…
Kolam refers to intricate patterns drawn both free handedly and by joining dots. These can be widely seen in the Southern part of India. Women draw this early morning, preferably before Sunrise after cleaning the courtyard. Earlier rice powder was used – it was a means to feed ants and small insects. However, these days, stone powder and even chalk is used. If such powders are used, it is called Pudi Kolam. Sometimes, brick powder will be used as outline on auspicious days, Tuesdays and Fridays. If rice powder is mixed in water and similar patterns are drawn, it is called Maavu/Maa Kolam. In West Bengal, it is called Alpona. In North India, people used rice/stone powders for the outline and fill the patterns with colors. This is called Rangoli.

It is believed that Kolam brings prosperity. It is drawn for almost all the auspicious occasions like marriages and festivals. When someone dies in the household, the family don’t draw any kolam for a year.  

Children in small towns learn the art of making kolam at a very young age. In fact, a girl who knows to draw impeccable and intricate kolam is a pride for the entire family and the village she stays. However, owing to modernization, city life and apartment culture, this art is soon dying.


Sunday, 16 August 2015

Cyclic Life

Life moves like a cycle.
I am on top today;
Tomorrow on the bottom!
So on and on J

Friday, 14 August 2015

Innovative Kolam


Kolam, like other art forms, requires innovation.
Twist a little… Tweak a little…
You get something fresh and new…

Probably like the one given above :P

PS: Because many people asked me what a Kolam is…
Kolam refers to intricate patterns drawn both free handedly and by joining dots. These can be widely seen in the Southern part of India. Women draw this early morning, preferably before Sunrise after cleaning the courtyard. Earlier rice powder was used – it was a means to feed ants and small insects. However, these days, stone powder and even chalk is used. If such powders are used, it is called Pudi Kolam. Sometimes, brick powder will be used as outline on auspicious days, Tuesdays and Fridays. If rice powder is mixed in water and similar patterns are drawn, it is called Maavu/Maa Kolam. In West Bengal, it is called Alpona. In North India, people used rice/stone powders for the outline and fill the patterns with colors. This is called Rangoli.

It is believed that Kolam brings prosperity. It is drawn for almost all the auspicious occasions like marriages and festivals. When someone dies in the household, the family don’t draw any kolam for a year.  

Children in small towns learn the art of making kolam at a very young age. In fact, a girl who knows to draw impeccable and intricate kolam is a pride for the entire family and the village she stays. However, owing to modernization, city life and apartment culture, this art is soon dying.


Wednesday, 12 August 2015

Konerirajapuram


Konerirajapuram is 22 kilometers away from Kumbakonam en route Karaikkal. This is a small village and famous for the world’s largest Nataraja idol (about five feet and five inches). Incidentally, legend says that it is a suyambu (self-made) idol. I was flabbergasted when I read about this temple and the temple priest further confirmed the story.

I gladly noted that the temple’s Kumbabhishekam had taken place recently. I felt blessed J

Kandaradhittha chola and his wife Sembianmaa Devi, grandparents of the famous Raja Raja Chola decided to make a Nataraja idol out of 5 metals (gold, silver, brass, copper and bronze) and dedicate to a Shiva temple. He is well known for his service to Lord Shiva, by building huge temples in his empire. He appointed a metallic sculptor and gave instructions. The sculptor made many idols, but the king was highly dissatisfied. Finally, the king was agitated and gave a deadline. He also added that if the sculptor is unable to make an idol that meets the king’s expectations, he would be killed.


The sculptor was a family man and was worried for his family. He did not understand why the king was rejecting the idols and was naturally frustrated. He was making the mold when an old man and woman came and requested for some water. The irrigated sculptor said, “There is no water her. All I have is this metallic liquid. If you want, you can drink it” and continued with his work. The old couple smiled in response and started drinking the metallic liquid. The sculptor was shocked and regretted for not serving his guests properly.


Later, he cried in delight when he noted that the old man was turning into a Nataraja idol. The lady beside transformed into His wife Shivakami. The sculptor had Goosebumps and was still in trance after seeing the divine transformation when the king walked inside.


“Are you trying to fool me? From where did you steal this idol?” asked the king. His anger was evident from the shrill of his voice.

“Honorable King, I did not steal this idol. Lord Shiva Himself presented with His wife in front of me as old couple. They requested for water, but I offered only the metallic liquid. They drank it and transformed into these idols. These are self-made, king!” the sculptor narrated in the middle of tears of joys.


The king refuses to believe the sculptor. He takes his mighty sword and cuts the idol’s left leg. Soon, blood start oozing from it. The king realizes his mistake. Lord Shiva appears in front of him and says that the king’s love for Him failed him from seeing the sculptor’s misery. He also added that the king refused to understand that human beings are born with limitations. The king was soon affected with cancer. The lord asked him to pray to Lord Vaidyanathan.


The king begged his pardon and requested the lord to stay in the idol form forever so that he has serve the Lord forever. The Lord agreed. He also gave moksha to the sculptor.

The Temple Pond in the front


PS: If you are planning a trip to Kumbakonam, Murugan Residency (I stayed here) and Sitthi Residency (Opposite to Murugan Residency) can be a really good option to stay. Do not miss the famous Kumbakonam Degree coffee… And for travel, if you are looking for a good taxi service, you can contact Shankar - 9524724442.

Sunday, 9 August 2015

The House That BJ Built


Details of the Book
Publisher        :           Westland
ISBN               :           9385152181 (ISBN13: 9789385152184)
No. of Pages   :           410 pages
Language        :           English


From the book blurb
I'll make my sisters squirm like well-salted earthworms. I won't sell. Even my jutti won’t sell. And if I die na, then even my ghost won't sell! The late Binodini Thakur had been very clear that she would never agree to sell her hissa in her Bauji's big old house on Hailey Road. And her daughter Bonu, is determined to honor her mother’s wishes.

But what to do about her four pushy aunts who are insisting she sell? One is bald and stingy, one is jobless and manless, one needs the money to 'save the nation' and one is stepmother to Bonu’s childhood crush, brilliant young Bollywood director Samar Vir Singh, who promised BJ upon his deathbed that he would get the house sold, divvy the money equally and end all the bickering within the family.

The first word baby Bonu ever spoke was 'Balls' and indeed, she is ballsy, bullshit-intolerant, brave and beautiful. But is she strong enough to weather emotional blackmail by the spade-full? Not to mention shady builders, wily politicians, spies, lies and the knee-buckling hotness of Samar’s intense eyes? Sharply observed and pulse-quickeningly romantic, this is Anuja Chauhan writing at her sparkling best!


Author
Anuja Chauhan went to school in Meerut, Delhi and Australia. She has worked in advertising for over fourteen years and has created many popular ad campaigns, including 'Nothing Official About it', 'Yeh Dil Maange More' and 'Oye Bubbly' for brand Pepsi. She worked in the advertising agency, JWT India, for over 17 years, eventually becoming vice-president and executive creative director, before resigning in 2010 to pursue a full-time literary career.

She has written 3 novels, The Zoya Factor (2008), Battle For Bittora (October 2010) and Those Pricey Thakur Girls (January 2013). All three books are romances.


Characters
Those Pricey Thakur girls:
Anjini still thinks that she is the prettiest among her five sisters…
Binodini is dead several years ago, yet lives in the heart of her daughter Bonu…
Chandralekha with shaved head, heading towards spiritual freedom is dirty mided…
Dabojini is content in her personal life with her handsome husband Dylan and two children, yet struggling financially in her professional life…
Eshwari is still single with big business plans and no job.

Samar, Anjini’s stepson and BJ’s eldest grandson is a Bollywood biggie with hot looks, creative brain and caring heart.

Bonita aka Bonu, orphaned at a tender age is independent, self-sufficient, trying to live in a way that would make her late parents proud… and nurturing the secret love for her step cousin Samar.

We also have chachiji who desperately wishes to impress her bed ridden husband…
AN aka chachaji, though sick to death, continues (tries) to charm women of his son’s age…
BJ is hit by Alzheimer’s and misses his late wife Mamataji...
Gulgul is caught between his righteous cousins, daughter-like Bonu and a dysfunctional family.
Satish Sridhar has shrewd business mind and dreams to fulfill his teenage fantasies.


What I think
The cover-page is vibrant depicting a charming girl with attitude. The book blurb is elaborate and gives away the plot rather interestingly. And, the title is just perfect!

As promised, the story is all about the house that BJ built and if those pricey Thakur girls sell the house or not. In spite of 410 pages, Anuja Chauhan startles the reader with several twists and turns. The narrative is lucid and incidents are quirky. Dialogs are relatable and characters have shades of grey – neither godly nor villainous. There is a splendid Bollywood movie-like charm about the book. It lets the reader envision not only the backdrop but the characters as well.

What I loved about the story is the sheer madness. It is everything a big fat Indian family would be. It also reemphasizes that blood is indeed thicker than water and at the end of the day, family matters! The hot and sizzling chemistry between Bonu and Samar is delicious. It would surely make you wish that you were Bonu (only if you are a woman reader, of course).

In short, Anuja Chauhan is back with another blockbuster book.


Should you read it?
Doubtlessly!
Indulge in the cacophony that happens in any signature Indian family J
Celebrate the madness and togetherness!!!

Don’t miss it, even if you have not read Those Pricey Thakur Girls.

Rating
4.5/5

Thank you
Thanks to Westland Publishers for giving away this book for review.
Being an ardent fan of Anuja Chauhan, I feel proud and elated.

PS: Anuja Chauhan, keep writing! J

PPS: Thanks to my cousin who introduced me to Anuja Chauhan several years before. Incidentally, I started reading Indian author books after reading Zoya Factor and Chetan Bhagat’s Five Point Someone of course J J