Wednesday, 3 December 2014

Little Kolam

Today, I present a tiny kolam for you…




PS: Because many people asked me what a Kolam is…
Kolam refers to intricate patterns drawn both free handedly and by joining dots. These can be widely seen in the Southern part of India. Women draw this early morning, preferably before Sunrise after cleaning the courtyard. Earlier rice powder was used – it was a means to feed ants and small insects. However, these days, stone powder and even chalk is used. If such powders are used, it is called Pudi Kolam. Sometimes, brick powder will be used as outline on auspicious days, Tuesdays and Fridays. If rice powder is mixed in water and similar patterns are drawn, it is called Maavu/Maa Kolam. In West Bengal, it is called Alpona. In North India, people used rice/stone powders for the outline and fill the patterns with colors. This is called Rangoli.

It is believed that Kolam brings prosperity. It is drawn for almost all the auspicious occasions like marriages and festivals. When someone dies in the household, the family don’t draw any kolam for a year.  


Children in small towns learn the art of making kolam at a very young age. In fact, a girl who knows to draw impeccable and intricate kolam is a pride for the entire family and the village she stays. However, owing to modernization, city life and apartment culture, this art is soon dying.

26 comments:

  1. that is quite intricate! but what is a kolam?

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    Replies
    1. Thanks...
      Kolam refers to intricate patterns drawn both free handedly and by joining dots. These can be widely seen in the Southern part of India. Women draw this early morning, preferably before Sunrise after cleaning the courtyard. Earlier rice powder was used – it was a means to feed ants and small insects. However, these days, stone powder and even chalk is used. If such powders are used, it is called Pudi Kolam. Sometimes, brick powder will be used as outline on auspicious days, Tuesdays and Fridays. If rice powder is mixed in water and similar patterns are drawn, it is called Maavu/Maa Kolam. In West Bengal, it is called Alpona. In North India, people used rice/stone powders for the outline and fill the patterns with colors. This is called Rangoli.

      It is believed that Kolam brings prosperity. It is drawn for almost all the auspicious occasions like marriages and festivals. When someone dies in the household, the family don’t draw any kolam for a year.

      Children in small towns learn the art of making kolam at a very young age. In fact, a girl who knows to draw impeccable and intricate kolam is a pride for the entire family and the village she stays. However, owing to modernization, city life and apartment culture, this art is soon dying.

      I have also updated my post explaining what a Kolam is...

      Delete
  2. very cool...did you do that in sand? or chalk?

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    1. I used stone powder. Some people use chalk also.
      Thanks Brian :)

      Delete
  3. This is put daily in the early morning outside the porch of houses in Sothern states of India after cleaning the place,sprinkling water in rice flour but often in white stone powder.The admirable idea is to provide food for ants and insects.
    The designs of kolam are innumerable and mind boggling.There is a geometrical pattern with points to be connected or enveloped.Bengalis call it Alpana and draw with liquid rice flour intricate patterns aesthetically.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks for sharing this sir.
      In Kerala also we use rice paste for drawing Kolam.
      I have updated my post too.

      Delete
  4. Kolam Kollam ! ( in malayalam that's Kolam is fantastic ! ) :)

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    1. Thanks a lot... :)
      (I know Malayalam!!!)

      Delete
  5. This is beautiful! Rangoli is an integral part of my family's festival traditions for ever!

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  6. Lovely...
    I draw it on sankranthi & other festivals mostly..even I'm from south...!!

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  7. Most of the ppl knew it as rangoli..hai na ??

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    1. I think people in Tamil Nadu and Kerala call it kolam...
      Karnataka Andhra and Northern India call Rangoli...

      Delete
  8. Hello Greetings.

    Kolam is something I don't normally see in Kerala. But when I was living in Chennai, Kolam is a normal sight. Women get up early in the morning, sweep their front yards, sprinkle water mixed with cow dung and draw intricate Kolams. Many of them were normally drawn with lines connecting numerous dots. However, when dots are made at first it is not possible to know what intricate patterns will emerge. Women from neighboring houses will try to show off their talent by trying to outdo each other
    I understand during Pongal festival a Kolam competition is held every year in a place called Mylapore. Numerous women take part in this competition. Many thanks for bringing those wonderful memories back to me. Best wishes

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    Replies
    1. I think the Tamilians/Brahmins living in Kerala put Kolam...
      I have also heard about the famous Mylapore kolam competition.

      Thanks for the comments and info sir :)

      Delete
  9. Oh I love making Rangolis :D:D:D
    My grandparents have this huge veranda so everytime on Diwali, We used to make it...

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